Faculty Honors and Accolades

Astrid M. Eckert (History) has received the 2013 Waldo Gifford Leland Award for her book The Struggle for the Files: The Western Allies and the Return of German Archives After the Second World War (Cambridge University Press). The award is administered by the Society of American Archivists and is given for writing of superior excellence and usefulness in the fields of archival history, theory, and practice.

 

 

New to the Faculty

Tanine Allison, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies

Tanine Allison completed her PhD in Film and Media Studies at the University of Pittsburgh (2010). Prior to joining the regular faculty at Emory in 2013, Allison held an ACLS New Faculty Fellowship at Emory. Allison’s research interests include the intersections of cinema and digital media studies. Her articles have been published in journals including Quarterly Review of Film and Video and Literature/Film Quarterly.

Emory Is Only Venue in Southeast to Screen Universal Pictures Series

 

For spring 2013, the Emory Cinematheque hosts the series “Universal Pictures: Celebrating 100 Years” presented by American Express in association with UCLA Film and Television Archive. Emory is the only venue in the Southeast to show the touring series.

These free 35 mm film screenings are presented on Wednesday evenings from Jan. 30 – April 24, 7:30 p.m. in White Hall 205 on the Emory campus.

Carl Laemmle founded Universal Pictures in 1912; in the late 1950’s, super-agent Lew Wasserman created an entertainment conglomerate that still thrives today as the oldest continuously operating film producer and distributor in the US. The program represents a vast range of genres and iconic titles such as “Dracula” (1931), Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds” (1963) and “Back to the Future” (1985).

 

Jan. 30: “Pillow Talk” (1959, Michael Gordon, with Doris Day and Rock Hudson)

Feb. 13: “Dracula” (1931, Tod Browning, with Bela Lugosi) and “Frankenstein” (1931, James Whale, with Boris Karloff).

Mar. 6: “Imitation of Life” (1934, John M. Stahl)

Mar. 20: “Never Give a Sucker an Even Break” (1941, Edward Kline, with W.C. Fields) and “Cobra Woman” (1944, Robert Siodmak)

Mar. 27: “Winchester 73” (1950, Anthony Mann, with James Stewart and Shelley Winters)

Apr. 3: “The Birds” (1963, Alfred Hitchcock, with Rod Taylor and Tippi Hedren)

Apr. 10: “Back to the Future” (1985, Robert Zemeckis)

Apr. 17: “Apollo 13” (1995, Ron Howard)

Apr. 24: “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005, Judd Apatow)

See the online release for film descriptions

Other screenings this spring include the experimental documentary “General Orders No. 9” (2011, Robert Persons) on Jan. 23; a Paul Simon documentary “Under African Skies” (2012, Joe Berlinger) on Feb. 6; and special events with Salman Rushdie, to be announced soon.

Emory Cinematheque is sponsored by the Department of Film and Media Studies.

Get more details

Seniors Choose to Create Art for a Living

See the Emory Wheel article (01.23.12) on Emory College seniors who are planning to work in art after graduation. The article profiles Gillian Kramer (Theater), Kala Seidenberg (Dance), Matt Gaynes (Film), and Charlotte Watts (Visual Arts).

With graduation fast approaching, Emory seniors are faced with a question: What’s next? This question is a particularly difficult one for students whose passions lie in the arts. Artists cannot spring forth into the world expecting to find a desk job awaiting them — they must work hard to get their names out there, network with others in their field and find a niche. So what, exactly, do the graduating artists of Emory have planned?

Read the full article

 

Fore! Bill Brown’s Golf Videos at the High

 

Bill Brown, faculty member in Emory’s Film and Media Studies Department and president of Atlanta Video, directed and produced two video presentations which will premiere at the High Museum of Art’s “Art of Golf” opening, Feb. 5, 2012.  These presentations (see below) were shot on location in Scotland and North Georgia and feature some of the world’s most acclaimed golf courses.

The first presentation features an innovative six screen video wall that greets all visitors to the exhibit. The wall features an interview with Jack Nicklaus, plus spectacular footage from the Royal and Ancient course in St Andrews, and other legendary courses in Scotland. There are also images from the stunning East Lake course in Atlanta and the Atlanta Athletic Club in North Atlanta. These videos are cleverly intercut with art works that appear in the show.

The second video presentation is a High Definition projection that features a montage of golfers on the courses introduced in the video wall. This very large projection is intended to give visitors to the Art of Golf show a sense of the challenges and design elements that make up courses like North Berwick, Gleneagles, Castle Course at St. Andrews, and Royal Aberdeen near Aberdeen, Scotland.

William A. Brown, who directed and produced these videos, is president of Atlanta Video Inc. and a faculty member in the Film & Media Studies Department at Emory University. Brian Brackney was the technical director and Brian Cox edited both programs. Atlanta Video, Inc. specializes in cultural, educational, and broadcast programming.

Immersion Video

Video Wall

Golf Demo

 

Free film noir this fall

The Emory Cinematheque Series presents film noir classics for its weekly 35mm screenings this fall.

Series curator Michele Schreiber says film noir never ceases to fascinate audiences. “These films are unique in their dark and pessimistic depiction of American culture—a rarity in the classical Hollywood period—and contain a host of other ingredients that make them among American cinema’s best: great music, striking visuals, interesting storytelling, and complex character types,” says Schreiber, assistant professor of film studies.

Emory Cinematheque, a collaboration between Emory College and the Department of Film and Media Studies, is one of the few film series bringing 35mm repertory programming to the Southeast. In addition, the film department hosts special screenings and lectures by international filmmakers, scholars and critics.

Coming up…

Wednesday, September 7, 2011
“Double Indemnity”
(Billy Wilder; Paramount, 1944) (1.37:1, 107 min.)

Wednesday, September 14, 2011
“The Killers,” Film Screening
(Robert Siodmak; Universal, 1946) (1.37:1, 103 min.)

Wednesday, September 21, 2011
“Lady From Shanghai,” Film Screening
(Orson Welles; Columbia, 1947) (1.37:1, 87 min.)

Wednesday, September 28, 2011
“Sorry, Wrong Number,” Film Screening
(Anatole Litvak, Paramount, 1948) (1.37:1, 89 min.)

See the full Cinematheque fall series

 

Meditation course helps inmates in Alabama prison

The Donaldson Correction Facility in Bessemer, Alabama, is the only maximum security prison in North America that allows prisoners an opportunity to take a 10-day (10 hours a day) Vipassana meditation course. According to psychologists at the prison, the biggest benefits to inmates is that it allows them to get in touch with their humanity, as well acknowledge their responsibility to themselves and others.

Last week several guests from the prison visited Emory to talk about the program with students and faculty in conjunction with a screening of The Dhamma Brothers.

The YouTube video above features Dr. Ron Cavanaugh, director of treatment for Alabama DOC; Kathryn Allen, PhD, Psychologist, Donaldson Correctional Facility; and Ben Turner, Vipassana Prison Trust.

The visit and screening were sponsored by Emory’s Department of Religion, Graduate Division of Religion, Ethics Center, Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding Initiative, Emory Collaborative for Contemplative Studies, Film Studies Department, and Emory Tibet Partnership.

If you attended the talks or screening, we look forward to hearing your comments below.

Emory Report (Feb. 25, 2011) article on the visit and screening

Upcoming Rushdie Events

Emory University Distinguished Writer in Residence Salman Rushdie returns to campus this semester for his fifth consecutive year of teaching, seminars and public events.

“Truth and Memory” Conversation

Sir Salman Rushdie will participate in a public conversation on the subject of memoir titled “Truth and Memory” with Dr. Rosemary Magee, vice president and secretary of the university, at 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 27 in Glenn Memorial Auditorium.

Admission is free and tickets are not required. A question-and-answer session is part of the event. Doors will open at 4 p.m. No large bags/backpacks, cameras or recording devices are permitted. The author will not be available for book signing before or after the event. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis and there is no overflow viewing area.

“Salman Rushdie’s work expands beyond the boundaries of fiction to consider important matters of memory and truth,” says Magee. “His perspective on the history and place of memoir in our literary tradition will similarly expand our own assumptions about these questions.”

Film Series Curated and Introduced by Rushdie

A public film series, “Great Works of Fiction Made Into Great Films,” has been curated and will be introduced by Rushdie. All films start at 7:30 p.m. and are screened in 35mm in Emory’s White Hall 208. Admission is free.

Films include:

  • Feb. 21: Pather Panchali (1955), 115 minutes. By Bibhutichushan Bandopadhyay. Film directed by Satyajit Ray. Print restored by the Satyajit Ray Preservation Project at the Academy Film Archive with funding from the Film Foundation.  Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.
  • Feb. 28: The Dead (1987), 83 minutes. By James Joyce. Film directed by John Huston.
  • March 14: Contempt (1963), 103 minutes. By Alberto Moravia. Film directed by Jean-Luc Godard.
  • March 21: Lolita (1962), 152 minutes. By Vladimir Nabokov. Film directed by Stanley Kubrick.

A Conversation With Robert Spano and Steve Everett

Rushdie also will participate in “Music and Literature in the Technological Age: A Creativity Conversation” with Robert Spano, music director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Emory University Distinguished Artist in Residence; and Steve Everett, professor of music at Emory. The event is scheduled noon-1 p.m. Monday, March 14 at Emory’s Cannon Chapel.

Rushdie Returns

Emory University Distinguished Writer in Residence Salman Rushdie returns to campus this semester for his fifth consecutive year of teaching, seminars and public events.

Rushdie will participate in a public conversation on the subject of memoir titled “Truth and Memory” with Rosemary Magee, vice president and secretary of the university, at 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 27 in Glenn Memorial Auditorium. Admission is free and tickets are not required. A question-and-answer session will be part of the event. [Doors will open at 4 p.m. No large bags/backpacks, cameras or recording devices are permitted. The author will not be available for book signing before or after the event.]

A public film series, “Great Works of Fiction Made into Great Films,” has been curated and will be introduced by Rushdie. All films start at 7:30 p.m. and are screened in 35mm in Emory’s White Hall 208. Admission is free.

  • Feb. 21: Pather Panchali (1955), 115 minutes. By Bibhutichushan Bandopadhyay. Film directed by Satyajit Ray. Print restored by the Satyajit Ray Preservation Project at the Academy Film Archive with funding from the Film Foundation. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive.
  • Feb. 28: The Dead (1987), 83 minutes. By James Joyce. Film directed by John Huston.
  • March 14: Contempt (1963), 103 minutes. By Alberto Moravia. Film directed by Jean-Luc Godard.
  • March 21: Lolita (1962), 152 minutes. By Vladimir Nabokov. Film directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Rushdie also will participate in “Music and Literature in the Technological Age: A Creativity Conversation” with Robert Spano, music director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Emory University Distinguished Artist in Residence; and Steve Everett, professor of music at Emory. The event is scheduled noon-1 p.m. Monday, March 14 at Emory’s Cannon Chapel.

Related Links

News release

Salman Rushdie Residency 2011