Announcing “The Visit 2013”

His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama, Presidential Distinguished Professor at Emory University, will return to Atlanta on October 8-10, 2013, for a series of public and campus events.

Two events—a public talk titled The Pillars of Responsible Citizenship in the 21st Century Global Village, and an afternoon panel session on Secular Ethics in Education—are scheduled for Tuesday, October 8, 2013 at The Arena at Gwinnett Center in Duluth, Georgia. Admission to both (or either) events is included with each ticket purchased.  Tickets go on sale beginning Friday, April 26 at 10:00 a.m. at http://www.gwinnettcenter.com, in-person at the box office at The Arena at Gwinnett Center, or by phone at 1-888-9-AXS-TIX. (Tickets will go fast!)

In addition to the public events, His Holiness the Dalai Lama will spend two days (October 9 and 10, 2013) on the campus of Emory University teaching students and engaging with the faculty. Emory community tickets to the on-campus events will be free and available through a lottery beginning September 1 through this website. A traditional Buddhist teaching will be arranged on campus through Drepung Loseling Monastery Inc. in affiliation with Emory University for their members and guests.

Public tickets are not available for the on-campus events/teachings except through sponsorship opportunities. See http://dalailama.emory.edu/support for details on how you can further the work of the Emory-Tibet Partnership as they work to bridge two worlds for one common humanity.

As in previous visits, His Holiness offers his appearance for the promotion of peace and does not receive any speaker fee. Funds generated through ticket sales are used solely to cover expenses, with any surplus being disbursed to charitable organizations under the advisement of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

The Visit 2013 Homepage

A Buddhist Perspective on Studying Science

Geshe Lhakdor, the director of the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala, India, talks about how science and spirituality, especially Buddhism, can complement each other to increase well-being and happiness.

Since the beginning of the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative (ETSI), he has played an integral role in establishing the connection between the Tibetan monastic community and Emory University, developing the science courses for the monastics, and preparing the add science materials into the core curriculum of the major Tibetan Buddhist monasteries throughout India.

His talk was held in conjunction with Emory’s Tibet Week, an annual celebration of the culture of traditional and contemporary Tibet (March 25-29). Tibet Week events include lectures, panel discussions, meditation, films and music.

Emory-Tibet Partnership Homepage

Tibetan Chalk Drawing on Campus

Tsering Phuntsok of Drepung Loseling Monastery in Atlanta created Tibetan chalk drawings to highlight the Tibetan Studies program at Emory (Sept. 5, 2012). In this YouTube video, Juana Clem McGhee, Academic Department Administrator in the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies (MESAS), talks about the significance of the drawings and some of the offerings of the Tibetan Studies program. For more information, see http://mesas.emory.edu/home/languages/tibetan/index.html

Also check out resources offered by the Emory-Tibet Partnership.

Techung and Guang Wang in Concert

 

Techung, a newly appointed Emory artist affiliate, and Guang Wang, cellist for the Vega String Quartet, Emory’s Quartet in Residence, perform “Gampa Lamo,” a song from the lay Tibetan musical tradition, at a concert of traditional Tibetan sacred music [December 2, 2011, Carlos Museum Reception Hall].

See previous post (with a video of Techung and Guang talking about the upcoming concert)