Bonna Wescoat (Art History) and Joyce Flueckiger (Religion) Win Guggenheims

guggenheim_awards520(Wescoat, left, and Flueckiger — Photo by Emory Photo/Video)

Bonna Wescoat, professor of art history, and  Joyce Flueckiger, professor of religion, are among 178 scholars, artists and scientists honored with Guggenheim Fellowships for 2014.

Wescoat will draw on more than a quarter century of field experience on the Greek island of Samothrace to write about the mystery cult of the Megaloi Theoi, the “Great Gods,” and its sanctuary, where she serves as director of excavations under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Flueckiger will spend the 2014–2015 academic year writing “Material Acts: The Agency of Materiality in India,” a book that will build on her three previous ethnographic research projects to examine a range of different kinds of material that are not usually included in the study of religion, such as saris and wedding pendants.

See news release

Related Video

Seeing Is Believing (Emory students under the direction of Bonna Wescoat, Professor of Greek Art and Architecture, address the longstanding question of why an ornate frieze was located in a seemingly obscure position high on the outside wall of the Parthenon.)

Virtual Rome at the Carlos Museum

The celebrated bird’s-eye view map of Giovanni Battista Falda, published in 1676, is transformed into a virtual, walkable, experience of Rome using the gaming platform NVis360, as part of the Michael C. Carlos Museum‘s special exhibition, Antichità, Teatro, Magnificenza: Renaissance and Baroque Images of Rome, on view from August 24 through November 17, 2013.

Virtual Rome was created from the great map (1676) and etchings of Giovanni Battista Falda (1643–1678), the map of Giovanni Battista Nolli (1701–1756), and historical and archival research into the fabric of seventeenth-century Rome. The project was carried out under the design, interpretation, and direction of Sarah McPhee, Winship Distinguished Professor of Art History at Emory University.

“The gaming platform allows us to follow the invitation of Falda’s prints to stroll the city with our eyes: to navigate lost streets and squares, take in vanished prospects, experience seventeenth-century Roman “teatri” in the round,” says Prof. McPhee. “This is the first time a gaming platform has been used at Emory University to recover urban history through an immersive and interactive reconstruction. We look forward to sharing the exciting results.”

See press release

Seeing Is Believing with Emory’s Parthenon Project

Emory students under the direction of Bonna Wescoat, Professor of Greek Art and Architecture, address the longstanding question of why an ornate frieze was located in a seemingly obscure position high on the outside wall of the Parthenon.

On November 10, 2012, students erected a replica of panels of the frieze at the Nashville, Tenn., Parthenon. Then they asked bystanders what they could see.

Visit Parthenon Project Blog

See eScienceCommons Blog post about the Project

Art History Students Tackle Parthenon Frieze Question

Emory students and scholars, under the direction of Bonna Wescoat, Professor of Art History, are working together to investigate the visibility of the Parthenon frieze by recreating reliefs (currently on view London and Athens museums) and installing them on the Nashville Parthenon.

The Parthenon Project Team will install the temporary frieze on November 10, 2012.

Read more about the project at the eScienceCommons blog.

nonsite.org publishes issue #2

The second issue of the Emory based journal nonsite.org is now online.

nonsite.org is a quarterly journal of art, philosophy and politics affiliated with Emory University. It is edited by Jennifer Ashton, Todd Cronan, Michael Fried, Oren Izenberg, Brian Kane, Ruth Leys, Walter Benn Michaels, Charles Palermo, Robert Pippin, Victoria Scott, and James Welling.

Issue #2, Table of Contents

Richard Neer, “Terrence Malick’s New World”

Dossier on Neuroaesthetics

Whitney Davis, “Neurovisuality”

Charles Palermo, Response to Davis with Reply by Davis

Blakey Vermeule, “Fiction: A Dialogue”

Jennifer Ashton, “Two Problems with the Neuroaesthetic Theory of Interpretation”

Blakey Vermeule, Response to Ashton

Charles W. Haxthausen, “Carl Einstein, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, Cubism, and the Visual Brain”

Brian Kane, “Music, Image Schemata and ‘‘The Hidden Art’”

Poetry

Michael Fried, “Three Poems”

Editorials

Interview with Robert Pippin: “After Hegel”

Interview with Walter Benn Michaels on Photography and Politics

Reviews

Ruth Leys, On Catherine Malabou’s What Should We Do with Our Brain?

Marnin Young, On Cathy Gere’s Knossos and The Prophets of Modernism

See nonsite.org for more recent additions.

For more information, contact Todd Cronan, Assistant Professor, Department of Art History.

 

Announcing nonsite.org

Check out the first issue of nonsite.org, a quarterly journal of art, philosophy and politics affiliated with Emory University.

According to the editors, the journal “emerges in part out of interest in a set of theoretical topics – the ontology of the work of art, the question of intentionality, the imperative to historicize, the ongoing appeal of different and sometimes competing materialisms – and in part out of opposition to the dominant accounts of those topics.”

The site contains a peer-reviewed quarterly journal with editorials, reviews, poetry and other features, including “the tank,” an on-line forum for solicited work in progress and for comment on it.

Editorial Board

Jennifer Ashton, Todd Cronan, Michael Fried, Oren Izenberg, Brian Kane, Ruth Leys, Walter Benn Michaels, Charles Palermo, Robert Pippin, and Victoria Scott